• Advertisement

Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

General Transport Discussion not specific to one state

Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

Postby Myrtone » Wed Oct 31, 2018 12:25 pm

I have noticed over time that buses (as road vehicles, unusually manually steered) and trams (as rail vehicles and always guided) are subject to different standards, sometimes arbitrarily:

*Headlights - In most countries most road vehicles have headlights off in broad daylight. In some countries, nearly all further from the equator than mainland Australia, daytime running lights (dimmer than headlights) are required on all new road vehicles and in some of these countries, road vehicles without daytime running lights must have headlights on at all times, but they may be dimmed during the daytime. This often applies to buses and trucks just as much as other manually steered vehicles. Also see drivers against daytime running lights.
Yet trams, which share the road with all these other vehicles, have long had headlights on at all times, even on systems nearest to the equator, and may be just as bright during the daytime as after dark.
*Response to driver blackout - trams, together with other rail vehicles, also seem to be safer in event of sudden driver decapitation than road vehicles, because they actually have a deadman's braking system to brake in event of any driver blackout, including the driver getting out of their seat. Road vehicles do not. It even gives me the impression that rail vehicle drivers have to be more highly disciplined than road vehicle drivers because they either have to hold something down continuously while moving, hold it down for a certain amount of time and then briefly release it or push a button periodically just to keep the emergency brake from engaging.
*Power supply - Overhead power is standard on surviving first generation tramway networks and is used throughout most new installations. There are no plans just about any surviving first generation tramway networks anywhere in the world, and these all have overhead power throughout, yet a few trolleybuses systems have been abandoned lately. And while there are no plans to dismantle existing trolleybus power networks, just like nearly all first generation tramways that survive, there haven't been many trolleybus revivals.
*Number of decks - Double deckers buses are still produced new to this day but there haven't been any new double decker trams for a long time.
*Vehicle length - In the past, most trams were about as long as most buses, but now most new trams, but not new buses, are longer than that.

And I'm sure the list goes on.
Myrtone
 
Posts: 259
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:29 am
Has thanked: 10 times
Been thanked: 5 times

Re: Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

Postby TA3001 » Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:23 pm

Myrtone wrote:*Response to driver blackout - trams, together with other rail vehicles, also seem to be safer in event of sudden driver decapitation than road vehicles, because they actually have a deadman's braking system to brake in event of any driver blackout, including the driver getting out of their seat. Road vehicles do not. It even gives me the impression that rail vehicle drivers have to be more highly disciplined than road vehicle drivers because they either have to hold something down continuously while moving, hold it down for a certain amount of time and then briefly release it or push a button periodically just to keep the emergency brake from engaging.


I think this is called an alerter. If you don't respond within about 7 seconds or something, then the emergency brakes will activate, at least on some trains. It is present on many types of trains. It's designed to prevent them from crashing into buffers/concrete walls at 80+ kph with the train at full capacity.
User avatar
TA3001
 
Posts: 1800
Joined: Wed Mar 10, 2004 5:01 pm
Location: Not on or at 1770.
Has thanked: 50 times
Been thanked: 84 times
Favourite Vehicle: Hills B58. In service - 880

Re: Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

Postby Myrtone » Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:26 pm

Yes, but it is also called vigilance control. And even deadman's braking is absent from virtually all manually steered vehicles.
Myrtone
 
Posts: 259
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:29 am
Has thanked: 10 times
Been thanked: 5 times

Re: Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

Postby boronia » Thu Nov 01, 2018 4:51 am

Hong Kong is still building double deck trams, but generally their slow boarding times make them unviable. Longer single deckers are a better format.

But the bus industry hasn't woken up to this.

I haven't seen many reports about drivers being decapitated on the job.
The Sydney Classic and Antique Truck (and Bus) Show
On again June 2019
@ The Museum of Fire.
User avatar
boronia
 
Posts: 18718
Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 5:18 am
Location: Sydney
Has thanked: 276 times
Been thanked: 1772 times
Favourite Vehicle: Dennis

Re: Different standards for buses and trams, some arbitary

Postby Myrtone » Thu Nov 01, 2018 4:59 am

boronia wrote:Hong Kong is still building double deck trams, but generally their slow boarding times make them unviable. Longer single deckers are a better format.

No, they are rebuilding old ones.
boronia wrote:I haven't seen many reports about drivers being decapitated on the job.
And yet deadman equipment seems to be standard on trams for one-man operation.
Myrtone
 
Posts: 259
Joined: Sat Apr 28, 2007 11:29 am
Has thanked: 10 times
Been thanked: 5 times



  • Advertisement

Return to General Transport Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests